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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
the president's tactics those of a socialist who wanted to bring down the american economy? >> i think they would, and i appreciate your bringing the economy into it. the president did that yesterday. the more we talk about the debt ceiling after obsessing over the fiscal cliff, the more i look at the whole thing as a massive dangling the key or, you know, don't look over here at the real economy, which is where people would really like policymakers to be dealing, but look at this so-called fiscal crisis which doesn't even exist. the president very clearly, and i thought helpfully, spelled out the numbers yesterday and actually to get from where we are, given the spending cuts and tax increases that we've implemented so far, to where we need to be to stabilize the debt, is not that heavy a lift if we had a functional politics that was actually paying attention to what needs to be done instead of creating these ridiculous self-inflicted skirmishes and wounds. as you have correctly pointed out, you have even got conservatives spokespeople saying, look, this isn't going to happen, you're
the count kraoe which has not occurred. we are more divided than before. and get the economy on a surround recovery to get out of a recession that we've had. the pieces of business hangover the president. he has proven that you can get reelected in a weak economy, which a lot of people, myself included thought would be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also cou
the way the move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs and map 21 helps to shorten project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster, when we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of h
: that is interesting. the president campaigned keeping the economy going. improving it. spreading the benefits to the middle class. immigration reform and energy reform. then newtown happened and that wasn't part of his agenda for the second term. then newtown happened and by all signs the president was deeply and personally moved. one of the reasons i suspect you can see there just to, standing to the left of them the fatherf two young daughters and the idea of these 20 young schoolchildren having been unabouted down i'm sure hit him very bern p personally. he decided to make that a huge issue in this campaign or rather in his second administration. it will be interesting to see. one of the things people say you don't want to overload the agenda but in addition everything he wants to do and obviously the debt and deficit he will have several battles with congress over that but gun control, he will try to take advantage newtown has happened and perhaps caused a tippingpoint in public attitudes and he will push that very aggressively. shepard: senator chuck schumer, the chairman of joint congr
, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] we remember the lessons of our past, years spent in poverty, the parents of a child with a disability had
to do. but he needs to get to work. and the number one problem is the economy. he's got to fix the economy. the fiscal situation has been fixed, to a large extent. the stock market's doubled. that's pretty good. but he has to get everybody working again. it means fix the economy. it means fix the education. so we're bringing kids along that have the skills for 21st century america. his focus has to be on the economy. on the need to reduce unemployment. and frankly, i hope he can, through his own example, restore a sense of civility in the country. >> every president learns a lot. is scarred by the office. also made more wise by the office. what is the one thing you hope president obama has learned over the last four years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all thi
on that investment? are you benefiting from that? is there enough tax being generated in the economy to offset that and when a disaster occurs are you on the hook for all the infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and isha return on that exposure greater than what your payoff would he? now the taxpayer, the answer unfortunately is too often now. we have subsidized risk to a point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessarily generating revenue or other societal benefits offsetting that risk. now, through the 70s and 80s and early '90s, when a lot of growth was taking place in growing coastal areas and other areas very few storms were occurring. the frequency was down so the illusion was i a pitcher for 3030 years and this never happened. the problem with climate and weather is 30-year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how these systems work. notts talking about any other issues and now we find ourselves in this increased activity and y
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
axelrod about some of the challenges the president will face. >> rebuilding the economy in which the american dream, the american compact is fresh where people who work hard feel like they can get ahead. that's not just about dealing with the fiscal crisis. it's about education, research and development, controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation, and we can't just do one piece of it. >> roughly 24 hours from now we will hear the president lay out some of those plans for the course of the next four years. david playofoffe, the president completed writing his remarks. now we just wait to hear what he has to say. >> and there were other active tifs involving the vice president. he was sworn in for a second time today. tell us about that. >> that took place about 8:20 this morning. he was sworn in by his choosing by the justice sonia sotomayor. a lot of people were asking why did that happen roughly 8:00 this morning. because the justice is actually on book tour right now. she had a previous commitment in new york. she had to hustle to a train to make that
, the others, to say we're never going to restore a decent economy here if working people have no rights. if people can't bargain with their employers, there's no place in the world where people who can't bargain raise their wages. in fact they get wage cuts on a continuing basis. and so i think that our strategy is to link core issues together so that it's not just quote, "labor," or particularly organized labor, as you said 12%, and that includes the public sector. private sector's under seven percent. it's notust labor talking about work's rhts. it's a of who have a vision of economic justice, let's do something about economic inequality. let's figure out how to stimulate the demand side of the economy because you need rising wages to have rising demand to get the economy going again. i think it's that kind of an agenda. and you know, in our view, what we talk to our members about, i was at a meeting in california of young new stewards on saturday, is this is seven to ten years. and, you know, i've been doing this my whole life. and i may not be there at the end of that period, but i
that the slaves produced for their masters and that made up the core of the southern economy. and only slave labor, only the labor of people who were owned outright by their owners, by landowners who had no right to object, much less to refuse the conditions under which they were compelled to work, only slave labor would cultivate those crops intensively and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. slavery's importance to the southern elite was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be an essential, even an irreplaceable fixture of society. it was inseparable from everything that they knew and loved. it was inseparable from all aspects of what they refer to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, the assumptions, the norms, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply and reflectsively attached -- reflectsively attached. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even sh
and hatred. our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. our healthcare is too costly costly and our schools fail too many. each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet. these are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. less measurable, but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land. a nagging fear that america owes the decline is inevitable, but the next generation must lower its sights. today i say to you that the challenges we face are real. they are serious and they are many. they will not be met easily or in a short span of time, that know this, america -- they will be met. [cheers and applause] on this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of her pace over conflict and discord. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recri
economy, is social justice. not trying to manipulate a society, not trying to move toward a collectivist society. so there are fairly radical -- radically different visions of what creates social justice, what creates that opportunity. i think we as the conservatives, as those who are defenders of freedom, have to constantly be pushing. even when we're running against that brick wall we've got to keep running into it until eventually we knock parts of it down because heaven forbid if this president were to get his vision of the agenda, what would this country look like four years from now? >> talk a little bit more about the tax component of the republican agenda. when you talk about tax reform what does that mean? >> one of the thing that -- things that has some of us enthused, chairman camp, at least this is what i'm hear they spent two years holding hearings, collecting information about what a much broader base, lower rate, a lot less, you know, sorry to throw some acquaintances under the bus, lobbyist created carveouts, special extenders in the tax code would look leek and why do we
a great deal of work to be done on the economy and a great many other things. nora o'donnell, the co-anchor of "cbs this morning" is down on the national mall and she has insight on what the president is looking to in a second term. >> that's right. on a day like this when most americans have expressed their frustration with washington, political leaders, this is day that we see hundreds of thousands of americans turn out to witness this piece of history. every second-term president since dwight eisenhower has had to deal with an opposition party in congress. that's nothing new that president obama is facing in this second term. but he's going to try and capture i think some of the magic of bipartisanship on a day like today. trying to put it in a bottle. because he really has a very ambitious agenda for his second term. we have heard him talk about it. gun safety, immigration reform. deficit reduction and those looming spending cuts that are a part of the sequestration. so that's lot before the president. but as major has noted this is a speech today that's not about specifics, but
, he's got a hundred days, really maybe a year to create his legacy. we're hearing the economy, taxes, gun control, immigration, energy policy. i look for him to hit on those themes, and i look for a theme of unit. i'll look to see if he can bring boehner and the republicans over or if he's going to try to exercise in a second term as a campaign style president, one role he's more comfortable in, really, than governing. >> just briefly here because we mentioned history and we started off the show talking about president george washington's second address which was only 135 words, shortest in history. when you look over history, what do you look to as a very significant inauguration, a point of comparison, if you will, to others? >> sure. well, this one feels to me like bush's, g.w. bushes 2004 election. i look to others as more inspirational. i look at the highenned security during lincoln's reelection where he referenced god 14 times, trying to bring the country together during a civil war that was dividing our nation. i look at the depression and fdr, trying to tell people that fear
and undermine their idealism. if we permit our economy to drift and decline, the vulnerable will suffer most. we must live up to the calling we share. civility is not a tactic or a sentiment. it is the determined choice of trust over cynicism, of community over chaos. and this commitment, if we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment. america, at its best, is also courageous. our national courage has been clear in times of depression and war, when defending common dangers defined our common good. now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers will inspire us or condemn us. we must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting problems instead of passing them on to future generations. together, we will reclaim america's schools, before ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. we will reform social security and medicare, sparing our children from struggles we have the power to prevent. and we will reduce taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the effort and enterprise of working americans. we will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness invite
a decent economy here if working people have no rights. if people can't bargain with their employer, there is no place in the world where people who bargain can't raise their wages. i think our strategy is to link core issues together so that it's not just, quote, labor or particularly organized labor. as you said, 12%, and that includes the public sector. private sector is under 7%. it's not just labor talking about workers' rights, it's all of us who have a vision of economic justice. let's do something about economic inequality. let's figure out how to stig stigmatize the rising economy. i was at a meeting in california of young new stewards on saturday. this is 7 to 10 years. i've been doing this my whole life. i may not be there at the end of that period, but i'm sure, absolutely certain, that without that kind of basic movement in this country, not just the traditional union agenda, we don't have a chance. on the other hand, with that kind of agenda, i absolutely believe we can change this country as president obama talked about in 2008. the change you can believe in, the chan
've gotten invite after invite. >> two weeks ago i would have said it's quiet this year, the economy, less excitement. and yet in the past four days, i've gotten invitations to things i had no idea were going to happen. things coming out of the woodwork. i don't know what it is. some people are scaling back instead of having big dance parties at night, a lot of corporations are doing brunches. whether that's actually less expensive or whether it's just supposed to look less expensive, i'm not exactly sure. but you are -- >> you think it's about optics. >> perhaps. i mean, that's certainly with the -- having the two official inaugural balls. >> i've seen so much ink about online and print and even on television, about the first lady's haircut. i wonder if this saturday, if people are going into their salons, amy, saying, hey, listen, can i get the -- michelle obama? yeah. >> yeah. >> what do you think? >> yeah, oh, i think so. we've seen the photo. we're going to want to see how the bangs move. that's what we'll be looking for. >> let's see. >> i've got the side sweep. she got the straight
reduction, measures to help the economy, energy, we have a stacked agenda here. i think urgency in the country to address this. >> there is only one guy that can lead in washington that can find a solution to big problems and that is the president. >> reporter: so bottom line is that the president is going to try to hit the big picture themes in the inaugural address tomorrow afternoon outside the west pointed of the capital and say some of thels that will divide both sides of issue. he will save that for state of the union address when he heads back to capitol hill. >> gregg: thanks very much. >> heather: frustration preparation is under way as washington gets welcome to hundreds of thousands of guests. carl cameron is at the national mall with more on that. >> the historic nature of inaugurating the first black african-american president is much different right now. it was a worldwide celebration and there were ten inaugural balls in washington, d.c. president and michelle obama went ball to ball in a big celebration. this time around, nations the challenges the country faces
important that be just people getting along in this town. they deserve a better economy. he's got to show the willingness to work with anybody but also the willingness to work against anybody who stops him from doing a good job. >> isn't that what republicans who say that compromise is a dirty word and it's important to standby your principles. >> i love paul. he's going to try to strike deals with republicans for big picture governance and get things done. run on politics, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation and do what he wants to do mr. the final two years. that's what paul is getting at. >> i am for striking deals. >> you're for striking republicans. >> i'm for cuts deals but i'm not for saying everybody should come together because here i am. >> when you say ruthless, if a republican member said be ruthless, people would be screaming at you. >> i wasn't quoting. maybe it was ruthless. >> what that means is cutting deals instead of just saying let's reason together, give them something and take something. do the -- >> okay. >> grimy, realistic sometimes unpleasant work of
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failures of second terms, wars, bad economies and corruption. and in washington, core run suggesti -- corruption is a dangerous thing, you are arrogant, been around too long, you drink that potomac water that can happen to anyone. the world is unraveling in front of us, the economy still in tough shape. president obama has a tough hand of cards to play here. >> congress is as popular as a root canal. only 7% of the american people have approvehood of congress. i think this president is going to get off to a great start tomorrow. congratulations, barack obama, the people are very excited to be here in washington, d.c. >> congratulations. on that we agree. >> the picture of diversity up here now. let's talk about diversity. the president has got an a lot of criticism for his senior cabinet picks, right? appears to be all white men here, senior adviser, valerie jarrett, an african-american woman, said this to cnn earlier today. let's take a listen. >> his cabinet, when he is finished, and he is far from finished, will have diversity, including women, including people of color. he beli
to pass comprehensive immigration reform. and we're going to put this nation's economy on a sustainable path to the future. >> the decency, the goodness, the resilience, the neighborliness, the patriotism, the sense of duty, of responsibility of the american people, you have inspired me throughout. throughout. >> president obama also showing his lighter side last night by mentioning how much he loves mrs. obama's new hairdo, the infamous bangs and everybody talking about her new hairdo. >>> barbara walters is hospitalized this morning after she fell at appear inauguration party. the veteran news woman reported lid slipped saturday night on a step at the residence of the british ambassador to the united states and out cut her forehead. a spokesperson says the 83-year- old is awake and alert. >>> up next on this inaugural morning, air piece of presidential history. we'll tell you more about an important part of this morning's swearing-in ceremony and its ties to president lincoln.  >>> welcome back. today, of course, the national holiday honoring dr. martin luther k
of that. we've got to get back to number one priority of creating jobs and getting this economy turned around. >> the dundee bait given the timing of the newtown shooting has become a big part of what the president wants to accomplish in this term. how devisive do you think it's going to be? >> i hope it's not divisive at all. the idea that we lost 20 precious children hopefully we hear this week from the gun control task force that the democrats have put forth from the wide range of gun rights and supporters and gun control advocates. i think we need to come together as a country as president obama said and say enough. >> thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> thank you very much. >>> president obama said recently that he likes a good party as much as anyone and he's about to get his chance. after the inauguration ceremonies, washington turns into party town. inaugural parties are paid for with the private donations, and big donors expect some presidential face time and possibly some favors in return. and there's no limit on how much they can g
it will be on the really important issues to the american public like how do we create jobs, get the economy running again? very importantly, how rain in the long-term debt? that would require a lot of concessions by democrats on entitlement programs. i think the president coming off of the fiscal cliff debate, the republicans, that was their golden moment to extract concessions from the democrats, specifically on social security. i think he would agree with me the end of the negotiations, the trade between the republicans and democrats was to do an increase in the debt ceiling, in exchange for cutbacks in so security cost-of-living adjustments. john boehner and republicans decided they want to have an argument over the debt ceiling, because of the new year we will be better positioned. they quickly have realized that is not going to be the lever they thought it would be. host: you have covered three presidents, clinton, bush, and now president obama. people say the political divide between these branches is stronger now than it has been in years. you agree or disagree? guest: i absolutely agree. host: wh
economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being responsible on debt issues when this president has been in the white house since january the 20th, 2009, and he has yet to do anything significant on social security or medicare. he cut medicare, so he could start a new entitlement program. that's not making medicare more solvent. he hasn't done anything to curb the costs of medical expenses, which he said he was going to do. he did nothing. he struck back room
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
, obviously the country was dealing with a big financial crisis and the economy was taking a turn for the worse, so the president was looking at hope and change and trying to be positive and bring the economy back. this speech was much different and it sounded more aggressive. the president can't run for election again, so the next four years, you got the sense that he was going to push for social change and you heard him use the word "together" at least seven times in his speech. he's going to be calling on americans for the next four years to be hammering it out with their local congressman and their local senators to try and push issues like gun reform immigration reform and for the first time, we heard a president use the term gay for gay marriage ever in an inaugural speech. so it was a different tone than four years ago. >> brandi hitt live for us. thank you, brandi. some folks said it seemed more like a state of the union address than it did an inaugural. he hit so many policies, whether it was climate change, the gay rights issue, equal pay for equal work, immigration refo
decisions but to secure equal pay for equal work, it to protect medicare for seniors and to build an economy that works for the middle class. that is exactly what we should expect from washington. [applause] i am proud to say that we have a president we can count on. president obama has been taking a strong stand with the women and families on health care, equality, economic security. he appointed two fantastic women to the united states supreme court. [applause] and he chose his biggest rival to be his partner on the world stage. we are so proud of hillary clinton. [applause] president obama trusts women and women can trust president obama. we have a reason to feel good about where we stand today. with the movement we have built together, we have reason to aim high elie the years to come. -- aim high in the years to come. last cycle, we more than quintupled the size of the economy -- our community. we're using technology to open our doors to another generation of women, and men, where we meet them. we reach them where they are. we help them understand what is at stake. we added in their voi
in the economy before he was inaugurated and nobody knew what he was going to do and people said that they should have sent signals. it would have helped the country but it seems like it helped them do a better job waiting. we've two of them for president now and the fiscal crisis and the war going on and everybody is wondering what is going to happen. what advice would you give to mccain or obama of the should do once they are elective or should they wait until they are inaugurated to say what they are going to do? >> the question is if i could repeat, another excellent question. the parallel between lincoln and fdr not doing anything in the four months that they faced the real crisis as compared to the crisis the next president will inevitably face and whether he should be involved. i will say quickly as daniel weinberg knows one of the inspirations for the book was jonathan alter's book on clinton's roosevelt first 100 days with strong sections on the president-elect and i still remember vividly which is the good thing about the book remember building reza on march 2nd or 3rd. you've got to do
a better economy. he has to show the willingness to work with anybody, but also the willingness to work against anybody who stops him from doing a good job as president of the united states. that was missing last time. >> isn't that what republicans who say compromise is a dirty word and it's important to stand by your principles? >> well, i love paul, he's outing the president's second term. >> it's the fundamental issue. is he going to strike deals with the president or does he decide that the only way to get things done is to defeat the republicans in the midterm election, to just run on politics, tactically maneuver, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation, and do what he wants to do in the final two years? >> i am for striking deals, if you watch that movie, lincoln, you're for striking deals -- i'm for cutting deals, but i'm not just for saying everybody should come together because here i am. kumbaya. >> when you say be ruthless, if a republican, if a tea party member said be ruthless people would be screaming at you. >> i said relentless but -- >> anderson said ruthless
, brought in bob gates and began to move to slightly more of a center position before the economy collapsed. >> rose: so what's the challenge for president obama in the second term? >> it's mense, brendan sullivan one of the great defense lawyers here in washington always says when you're in a negotiation and you have the upper hand as obama has had in the first term and may continue in the second term, when you have that upper hand and you beat your opponent you need to let them leave the field with dignity. and that is not obama's style. if you google "obama rebukes republicans" it goes on and on andn. he is always going after the people -- his beating. just a tactically i think that's a mistake and hopefully it will change. on the foreign affairs front if you talk to the intelligence people they say that the world is increasingly dangerous, you have meltdown situations potential meltdown situations not just in syria and the middle east, pakistan, north korea whh hashe bomben like iran and that is just ticking away. there's the egypt problem, there's what's going on recently in algeria an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)

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